351 Comments

Thank you for the updates to your original post about SSRIs.

The FDA and drug companies have long been aware of the link between antidepressants and violence/suicide. Here's my Substack post I originally wrote for Dr. David Healy's website about the long history of antidepressants. (If you don't know his work Healy was instrumental in getting the UK warnings and has been an expert witness in many of the lawsuits against the companies on suicide/violence.)

https://acceptablecollateraldamage.substack.com/p/guns-mental-health-and-drugs

Akathisia is often a precursor to violence/suicide. Most prescribers have no idea what akathisia is or looks like. When patients describe akathisia, many times the doctors think it’s their “disease” getting worse and layer on more pills. Pfizer intentionally kept akathisia from GPS as noted by internal company documents released in my lawsuit. I can send you the documents.

Since neither the FDA nor the companies are doing their job, my friend who lost her 58 year old husband to Paxil suicide established an organization called MISSD.org. The sole mission is to educate public and doctors about akathisia. I am proud to be on Wendy Dolin’s board.

Also, to date, there has never been a formal investigation into the meds after a mass shooting. The “fixers” get in there and quickly shut up any link to pills or their mental health records. It is high time that the public demands Congress to hold investigations like they did back in 2004/2005 on suicide link. We need to push for shooters list of medications and prescribers to be released. Privacy laws shouldn’t cover in these cases. It’s just a question that we need to ask.

Just this week Medpage reported ...

"In its Annual Report to Congress, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force picked anxiety disorders, depression, and suicide risk prevention requiring urgent research."

Remember this is the same group who recommended that EVERY person under age 64 should be screened for anxiety. We know that antidepressants or some other psych drug are often prescribed.

We will need to watch this closely to see $$$ for behavioral health/school clinics/services and psych meds/vaccines/treatments.

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Nov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor

Aside from our pediatrician trying to force Covid shots on our kids, the other reason I had to discontinue having them followed by this group is the constant screening for anxiety we had to face at every appointment. After reading all of the above the root of problem is big pharma and their constant mission to get people hooked on these meds. And just as the companies like Pfizer did with the Covid shots, they did the unthinkable & hid the evidence of dangerous adverse events because they were motivated by profit.

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Most people aren’t aware that the PHQ9 screening form was created by Pfizer marketing guy. They wanted to move prescribing out of psychiatrist’s office and make more accessible for GPs/internal med/pediatricians to write scripts. There are a lot more of them than psychiatrists. If you look at the bottom of these screening forms it will say generous donation by Pfizer and three key opinion leader doctors in the field of psychiatry. It is a widely accepted form for screening and a lot of health systems use it.

FYI - You can refuse to fill out. It is in my records that I won’t complete this screening form. It is a classic marketing tool. Bring them to the funnel and once they are in the system, the company has a customer (aka patient.).

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Ugh! This I have such a problem with. It’s even used in schools to screen kids and at the beginning of the school year when parents are bombarded with pages of registration forms, there you will find your local school districts mental health screening tool. The Emergency data card that is also in the stack of registration forms, a parent’s signature gives the school a blanket form of consent to all screenings and other interventions that might be needed. It’s easily abused by our “trusted” school administrators, counselors, school nurses and teachers who know enough to be dangerous.

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No more state schooling for our kids. 50 years ago the 13 year old girls at our school in Cambridge UK were vaccinated. I think it was for Rubella and the talk was that it was to protect their future fertility ( I think). I recall that day. It felt wrong to me then and it still does. I believe that was the first time I started to distrust state doctors and state schools. Please do not get me started on dyslexia. What has school got to do with pushing drugs or acting as a drug injection center?

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Thanks for the information. I’ll refuse next time that form is asked to complete, usually at start of a new year they ‘need to update.’

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AND - most of the problems with prescribing these drugs are coming from GP's, not psychiatrists. Not all (psychiatrists are excellent gaslighters) - but most.

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Nov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor

This must be why every visit to a doctor asks if I have any anxiety or suffer from depression. Response is always NO. Next visit, same question. After the visit sometimes get a call from insurance provider for my Medicare supplement asking about my emotional health. 😩🤦‍♀️😩

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Ditto. I have to see my doctor monthly and now when I get the form I either leave questions unanswered or just write at the top no changes from last visit. Tomorrow I’m only going to write my name and leave the rest blank. Once I wrote about a serious incident I had and they didn’t give a damn about it. Why ask then?

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deletedNov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor
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We need legislation to make giving doctors financial incentives, and doctors' taking them, to prescribe any given drug or treatment flat-out illegal.

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Nov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor

Like this X infinity.

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Wouldn’t this be wonderful?

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It would be a game-changer.

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Indeed, but you know what, I think this might actually be politically possible in 2024, at least in some states. Well, we shall see.

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Nov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor

It’s always about the money, not our health.

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They hold people with problems hostage by testing their new concoctions of addictive antidepressants or anti-anxiety medications, often making them worse due to suppression of energy.

Psychiatrists and therapists cost hundreds of dollars an hour now without insurance.

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Fortunately I’ve never answered yes. It’s a shame that the medical community can’t ask because they are concerned about seniors but because they have a quota.

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Nov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor

And now schools are giving kids surveys "screening" for depression.

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Nov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor

“Do you feel safe at home?”

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How creepy is that ?

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This is what I was thinking about: https://citizenslighthouse.substack.com/p/you-asked-kids-what

If it's happening in Florida, I think you can bet your sweet bippy it is happening in many other states, and under the parents radar.

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Quick question Kim. Have you ever heard of what this reader is describing?

https://www.midwesterndoctor.com/p/there-is-decades-of-evidence-that/comment/43068727

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Yes, I have heard Wellbutrin (bupropion) being used to help quit smoking although it was originally approved as an antidepressant for depression. It's the same as Zyban which was approved for smoking cessation. Both made by GlaxoSmithKline. It is similar to how Prozac was repackaged as Sarafem and got approval for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Same drugs.

Most people including the doctors have NO idea that the FDA removed the blackbox warning of neuropsychiatric language describing serious mental health side effects from the smoking cessation drugs in 2016. Pfizer went to the FDA to get the warning removed from Chantix. This was after they settled over 2700+ lawsuits prohibiting the victims to ever tell their stories in public as part of the settlement. This was an unprecedented move by FDA to remove a blackbox warning.

I was on the FDA Advisory Committee and was excited to ask where all the victims were as well as the lawyers. I truly believe Pfizer learned from the antidepressant hearings and wanted to shut up all the victims/lawyers. Days before the FDA ad com, I received a call from the FDA that it had come to their attention that I had an "intellectual bias" and was being removed from serving as Consumer Rep for this meeting. I still attended the meeting as a member of the general public so that I could speak up during the Open Public Hearing. The unfortunate thing is that the advisory committee members voted to remove the warning did NOT know or discuss the fact that Pfizer had just settled 2700 lawsuits for the exact problem that Pfizer now said their new EAGLES study showed doesn't exist.

I tried to get the mainstream media to pick this story up. It is HUGE and the doctors and patients have no idea the back story of how the blackbox warning was removed. Now they think it is "safe" and no neuropsychiatric issues like hallucinations, violence, psychosis, etc. https://www.namd.org/journal-of-medicine/1930-white-washing-a-black-box-warning-what-went-wrong-with-chantix.html

There was even a lawsuit filed on behalf of the plaintiff experts: Tom Moore (Institute of Safe Medication Practices) and Dr. Joseph Glenmullen (Harvard Psychiatrist) to get the court sealed discovery documents with major public health consequences released. The premise of the lawsuit was based on the tobacco litigation BROWN & WILLIAMSON, 710 F.2d 1165, 1180 which says “The societal interest in knowing what went wrong and why is great.

•••Judges should [] consider the interests of litigants in other suits,

the needs of regulatory agencies to have access to information,

concerns of public interest groups, and the interests of future plaintiffs.

•••Indeed, common sense tells us that the greater the motivation

a corporation has to shield its operation, the greater the public's need to know. ”

Ultimately the case was dismissed by a judge that sided with Pfizer.

Again, this was a Pfizer initiative, but ultimately the FDA removed the warnings for all smoking cessation.

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Sorry, my question was specifically was in regards to having dreams of the violently psychotic behavior.

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Absolutely I have heard reports of people having violent nightmares like this person describes.

I don’t often mention that days before Woody died he told me that he was having nightmares that scared him.. When I asked him to describe the nightmare, he wouldn’t repeat it as it was too disturbing.

At the time I remember thinking that’s odd because Woody used to think he didn’t dream become he never recalled them.

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Just saw an article at Stat News crying that the suicide warnings on antidepressants are causing suicide, by inducing people to not take the drugs. Won’t send people there. Since so much of medical education comes from drug manufacturers, doctors are going to continue to miss the signals of adverse drug reactions. We should not couch side effects in euphemistic or even soft sounding medical terms from foreign languages, or last names of first publishers.

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Especially since, after COVID mandates, policies & lockdowns, the MSM is proclaiming that we are in a "mental health crisis," and guess what is the #1 "standard of care" answer to that? I am watching with trepidation. Surviving Antidepressants (website) catches as many as we can, but we are all volunteer, and cannot intervene in the distresses caused by these drugs - it's the internet, and we're only peers. And how long can we continue? All the volunteers also have lives.

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" It is high time that the public demands Congress to hold investigations". The special committee on vaccines has yet to meet. Nobody is being held to account. I suspect the corruption has become total. Just like the "war on drugs" for illegal drugs, the profits are so large that the corruption touches nearly all involved.

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Feeling depressed, naturally, is painful and needs to be addressed, but even worse is "anti-depressant depression". It's like your thoughts become oily, and slither around in strange ways.

As far as the disconnection, it can be experienced in a couple of ways in addition to what others have mentioned:

a) the colors in the world are less vivid, less saturated. It's similar to seeing a digital image that has been slightly made blander, but at the same time the edges become sharper.

b) the world becomes drier. It's like there used to be a moisture between you and everyone else - a warm, joyous liquid, but on the drugs it becomes diluted, and no longer nourishes.

I know a single mom who kept her daughter sedated like a potted plant from age five until 16, when the girl was finally removed and the drugs cut back, but it was too late. A rambunctious little girl with a mind able to make verbal connections blisteringly fast is now almost mentally disabled. Her speech patterns are broken and stilted. It's really hard to see this as anything but organized abuse.

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So oddly enough, frequently when I do something that is profoundly healing for someone (or a patient gets that result with someone else) they will share that everything looks more vivid and they see more colors..

It is hence quite intriguing that SSRIs do the exact opposite of that. I appreciate you sharing this and will pin the comment.

Thank you

ps poor girl, I've seen similar cases to that too :(

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Very common. I've described it on Surviving Antidepressants (tapering, coming off the drugs) as walking out of a swamp. First, your eyes clear the water, and you start to see & be able to think. As you slowly trudge through the mud & slime, your shoulders & chest get above the bog, you start to feel, you start to love. Time passes - it's a slow process, trudging through the quagmire. You get your belly out of the mud, and all those traumas start to return - all the feelings you suppressed (and if you started antidepressants at a young age, never even learned) start to ravage you - but - look, you can see the horizon, you can see the sun. Being able to see is what helps you to keep plodding along.

The mud sucks at your lower extremities for many years - fatigue, pain, myriad "weird" disorders, but your head is above the mire, so you continue. Gradually, you come out of the swamp and begin to move more freely.

I believe, after 10 years of working on this, I'm only about ankle deep now. I will never again take a drug which requires this level of tapering, No ma'am! (by comparison, I can come off an opiate in one month or less).

I believe that (thank you MWD) learning about zeta potential (and my regular tai chi / qigong practices) is helping to turn the corner & speed the process - but - the fact of the matter is, that neurotransmitters adjust at the speed they will adjust. The process cannot be rushed. Time is the best healer.

These concepts are most difficult to explain, when someone comes to Surviving Antidepressants (tapering website) after a cold turkey or too-fast (usually doctor supervised) taper - they come in crisis, and they want to be better now. Sometimes they report every 6 hours that "it's not better yet." It is disheartening to hear that it may take years to escape what has been done to them. It is horrible to have to teach people this level of patience.

Those that learn it - learn to manage their moods on their own. Learn a lot about health & wellbeing. Self-regulate. We call it "SA University," the graduates are truly amazing people. But sadly, most people come to us too dysregulated to manage their own taper. It's too hard to believe that you should go so slowly.

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Are you familiar with William Walsh's work, identifying metabolic/biochemical issues that cause mental disorders and treating them with nutrient supplementation (and sometimes detoxification) protocols?

Walsh-trained physicians treat many patients who come to them taking psychiatric medications. Patients are told that when they've been on their Walsh protocols for a few to several months (depending on diagnosis) and have seen good improvement, they can go back to the practitioners who prescribed their drugs and ask about reducing their dosages.

Walsh says many patients on his protocols are able to get off their psychiatric drugs. Some, particularly schizophrenic and bipolar patients, do best if they continue drugs, but at a much lower doses than pre-Walsh-treatment.

I suspect the Walsh protocols would significantly speed the tapering process for most people attempting to get off psychiatric drugs, because the protocols work to normalize neurotransmitter levels.

I highly recommend Walsh's book "Nutrient Power: Heal Your Biochemistry and Heal Your Brain." The Walsh Institute website has a list of Walsh-trained practitioners.

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Yes, orthomolecular and functional medicine has been an important part of the healing process.

HOWEVER, Walsh does not help with getting off pharmaceuticals. He helps balance the brain from it's natural state. It can be dangerous to send people tapering directly to orthomolecular lest the practitioner go into "detox" and "pyroluria" protocols which can be harmful in withdrawal.

THERE IS NO "SPEEDING" THE TAPERING PROCESS!!!!!! (sorry for yelling) Transmitters adjust at the speed they will adjust, it does help to support the brain, but you cannot taper any faster.

I would be a wealthy woman if I had a dime for all the people who regretted a fast taper. I have yet to hear a single person complain that they tapered too slowly.

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I stopped Effexor in 2002 and that choice is still affecting my life today. At the time, my withdrawal was classified as a nervous breakdown. I made the decision myself to do what I did but I was in some distress over a lifetime of negative interactions with medical professionals and felt like I was on my own. Anyway, my point is, thank you for what you are doing!!

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Eff is effing horrible! Don't know how you did it (assuming cold turkey or something close) - but I know many many people who go back on it - or stay on the last 37.5 mg indefinitely. It hits so many receptors and fiddles a lot of systems. WELL DONE!

And the symptom set for Eff is pretty special, too. Irritable skin, akathisia, headaches, insomnia . . . but the irritable skin thing seems specific to Eff.

I was on Eff for about 5 years, and didn't taper properly (cross-taper to another drug, gawd knows you can't have an "unmedicated bipolar" - which I now am!). I'm certain that my "bipolar symptoms" got worse during that transition - but it's fuzzy. The sensations while drugged - it's not really me, is it? I couldn't believe that these people were giving Eff to a "bipolar." It seemed contraindicated. But 2 diff psychiatrists did so.

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I talked to a psych NP who told me parents commonly badger him to prescribe ADHD meds to their kids. He says he tries to talk them into using other methods to address behavior they don't like. But they're not receptive and push for the meds.

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Yes, patient demand (ads on TV) does drive a lot of prescriptions!

Social, peer & school pressure contribute. My brother had dyslexia - instead of drugging him (in the 60's & 70's), they held him back a year. There was a bit of stigma with being "held back," but he went on to be much more successful than myself (for whom school was a breeze).

When Johnny might get "held back" for his behaviour, this is a lot of pressure on the parents. Snowflakes might not survive being "held back." It might even get to the level of, "Johnny cannot attend here unless he's 'fixed'," which, in this day and age, really throws it back onto the parents.

The pressure to conform is now greater than ever.

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I was on Dex for ADD, the only one that worked for me, for 30 years. My primary doctor said she'f prescribe it so I didn't have to travel & pay big bucks for a specialist.

It was a godsend for for a long time but it is addictive and tolerance builds up.

When I switched doctors I couldn't find a local Dr. who will prescribe it.

After a year without it I am still withdrawn, listless, depressed, paranoid in public and I want to die. I avoid groups and won't answer the phone.

I can't bear traveling to find a new doctor & pleading my case only to be refused. I never could have anticipated it.

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Well I hear you. If you were managing well on it with no abuse then that should carry some weight. Fwiw the ephedrine sulfate (brand name Bronkaid) tablets I use for seasonal asthma feels like a pep pill so I can only tolerate it when I really must have a bronchodilator. It feels like Dex I toyed with in college. Those meds are really dangerous for most people but to be yanked off after 30 years is really not right. Best of luck to you.

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Nov 5, 2023·edited Nov 7, 2023

When ADHD became a thing even family doctors diagnosed and prescribed it . I find that after covid became king, and locked down what doctors can and can't do, primary doctors will not prescribe it. There must be a penalty like writing extra reports or something.

They want me to go to a Psychiatrist 20 miles away.

My original neurologists changed their field of specialty to other areas - sleep studies & pediatrics, so something must be going on. They probably found out it does permanent damage or it's not profitable, or too much gov't red tape oversite.

I had 30 years able to function more normally but now I'm worse off than before.

Thanks for your input. That ephedrine was bad stuff unless you were dying from lack of air.

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Best of luck & blessings to you to live & to chart a new path. ❤️🙏

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sports parents do this, fyi. I was advised around 7th grade when my kid was a good athlete to "get an athletic asthma prescription and get them on adderall" - with recommended doctors to facilitate this (by other parents, who were trying to be helpful!). the steroid inhaler helps with their run speed and the adderall is well, actual speed.

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Sports industry is an all around moneymaker for the medical industry, and you will see health systems with contract relationships with sports teams.

Orthopedics is much more fascinated with getting a pro player or even a kid player back on the field than a little old lady's knees from a social standpoint as well as financially.

Now that there have been shortages of ADHD meds, imagine the complications for patients caused by the balance of these and the other psych meds.

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It is abuse. My old school friend's wife allowed a thousand children at the school she heads up to be vaccinated. I told him to tell her to quit sooner than allow that. Do you think he listened? Do you think he informed her? How many are injured? How many have died? As long as they have plausible deniability and pension in place they would shoot their own grandmother if they were ordered to by their boss. I reckon that is 6/10 - or maybe 7 - of the whole lovely human race. Machiavelli in chapter 15 of The Prince reminds us that most people care more about what they stand to inherit from their father than their father himself - he is depressingly right I think. Ignorance, self interest, laziness, self obsession, lying and status above all things are - oh, and new technology, of course - what lead to mass poisoning and the end of what was left of freedom. Time to plan your escape route off the grid and far away from the matrix?

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A kindergarten student at my nieces' private school in Howard County, Maryland, died of a brain bleed last spring. A first responder friend tells me he's never encountered that before. The residents of that metro-DC/Baltimore county are lunatics and all stampeded to get the COVID-19 jabs. Especially the parents at that private school: one didn't allow her three children to leave house and yard for over two years after COVID-19 hit the news. And she was heard saying: if only every single human being at that school were jabbed then MIGHT let her kids return. I found myself pondering what kind of psychosis this will create in her children. In my long life I don't remember anything like this insanity and I grew up before polio was completely stamped out.

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wow that's insane

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Polio profoundly affected my family and I don’t understand this attitude either.

I found out this week that my seven-year-old friend across the hall is not allowed indoor playdates. Ever again. This is a child I cared for regularly between the ages of one through four (at which point her parents began shouting “get back, get back!!!!!” whenever she tried to run to me in the hallway. By the way, I live by myself and work from home. Her dad thinks that keeping this kid germ free is the most important thing. This child is the most open hearted, social kid I’ve ever met. Maybe that will see her through somehow. P.S., the dad is a bartender who goes to work and picks up the germs of the public he serves several times per week.

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Nov 4, 2023·edited Nov 4, 2023Author

If anyone can make out what the last few words in the patient note I transcribed were, I'd very much appreciate that. The best I could do was:

[Pt. began to verbalize feelings of killing other people and then himself. Pt. ..…. much more anxious and depressed than baseline; even though this is not reflected in …..]

Doctors sadly are not known for having the most legible handwriting...

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Nov 4, 2023·edited Nov 4, 2023

Looks like "Hamilton"

Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale?

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author

Thank you! That's definitely it.

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Nov 4, 2023·edited Nov 4, 2023

FYI don't think you want a person like Bilbo'sBitch posting on your site. Just a heads up

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PT begin to verbalize feelings of killing other people, and then himself. PT LOOKED? Much more anxious and depressed than (at) baseline; ... I think maybe that one word would be ‘LOOKED’

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Yaa, you're right.

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Great article....at the VERY LEAST, it's clear that the correlation requires more study, but I think we all know why there's no studies being done......

The day that the Big Pharma empire comes crashing down can't come soon enough.

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That day will not come until after Corporate Media is held to account for being completely bought out and in bed with Big Pharma (simply look at the % of ads on TV), and Big Government Uni-Party. Who was it that said the media was the enemy of the people? The outsider who did not need to be bought...

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Nov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor

Repeal Durham-Humphrey and all Intellectual Property except trademark.

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Please explain

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Nov 6, 2023·edited Nov 7, 2023

The Durham-Humphrey amendment makes all drugs prescription-only unless the FDA specifically allow OTC sale. This is the main precedent to both the drug war, and banning ivermectin, hydroxychloroquine, etc. IP (patents, copyright, FDA licensure, etc.) provides Big Pharma, etc. their excessive profits. You can't sell a generic until the patent expire, and then must get an FDA license. Trademark must be kept so others don't claim to sell "authentic" David O'Halloran products. Some customers may want to be sure you get the profits. Why not post a discount sahibamd Substack (Wordpress, etc.) with all the exclusive and proprietary material? Who knows what a drug, etc. be if you can't believe the name on the label. Sure, the FTC or something may "require" accuracy in labeling, but drugs can have unmentioned differences. Some tryptophan had an unlabeled impurity causing toxicity, and different brands of the same drug have differences in assimilation and efficacy.

If AMD develop a much safer and more effective according to him antidepressant, let's call it "Amdexa" (not to be confused with dextroamphetamine, even if it contain some), generic name "garbatine", go ahead and sell your own garbatine, but don't call it Amdexa.

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I will share my own experience. I take Zoloft for PTSD. It isn't a large dose and never has been. I had a very good psychiatrist when I first did seek help. She started me at the smallest dose and told me to increase to my comfort when symptoms went away. It stopped me from remembering my nightmares and still does. Other providers have told me that it doesn't, but it really does work for that. Providers have told me a lot of things that I should and shouldn't feel. Maybe they should have joined me on the battlefield and see if their view changes. :) I personally am thankful that she knew this aspect of this drug. How those nightmares affected me, I remember well. I know I still have them sometimes, but I don't have to deal with the effects of them any longer. I think many just throw medication at people. I know someone that was diagnosed with bipolar and was on 6 meds. Moved to another state and saw someone else and diagnose her with ADD. Stopped all those meds and changed her to just one. She was a changed person after that. Like anything in life, finding those that truly understand, listen and help is a challenge. I took responsibility for my PTSD. No one else understands what is happening inside me anyway, even if I tell them.

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author

I'm happy that worked for you. Prazosin is the most commonly used drug for PTSD nightmares that people find works.

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It's great that you, J.T., have a competent physician who is able to monitor the results of treatment. This makes a huge difference in the successful choice and use of any drug.

A major truth in the article is that few acknowledge the need for these drugs to be tapered when withdrawing, and that patients who are on them should take them regularly.

Prozac is very long acting so it self-tapers to a significant degree. Paxil is the shortest acting SSRI, and irregular use, or failure to taper could cause problems with this drug and other short acting drugs of this class. Concomitant use of Paxil and Celexa, mentioned in the article, seems like a particularly bad idea. SSRIs and SNRIs with approval for different indications has caused duplication of therapy and harm to patients. Duloxetine has a pain indication and this has caused it to be used together with other similar drugs. Interactions of SSRIs and SNRIs with other drugs have been a huge issue.

Lots of patients complain about the difficulty of withdrawing from Effexor.

Duloxetine is another drug which is a serious problem when not taken on schedule.

The combo of SSRIs, SNRIs and other psych meds, and tramadol can result in serotonin syndrome.

I conclude that there's a place for most of these meds, but they have been OVER-prescribed, incorrectly prescribed, and monitored VERY poorly, leading to disastrous results.

8 minutes is not long enough for a decent patient evaluation.

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It is a myth that Prozac is self-tapering, as it is also a myth that depot shots are self-tapering. Chart from: http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/healthadvice/treatmentswellbeing/antidepressants/comingoffantidepressants.aspx

points out that all of the antidepressant drugs have difficulties in tapering. Note that 44% of people coming off Prozac have difficulties. If you went to a car mechanic, and he said that there was a 44% chance that you would be in danger, would you go to that mechanic? These' aren't good numbers! Worse on this list is venlafaxine (Effexor) with 82% of people having trouble, escitalopram (Lexapro) 75%, paroxetine (Paxil, Arapax) & duloxetine (Cymbalta) at 69%. Medium troubles with sertraline (Zoloft) and citalopram (Celexa) at 62% and 60% respectively. The "easiest" on this list are fluoxetine (Prozac) at 44% and mirtazapine (Remeron) 21%.

The length of half-life does make for important considerations in tapering, paroxetine is particularly evil with it's tiny half-life. Other considerations are how many receptors it hits (this gets really evil with antipsychotics like Zyprexa) - like Cymbalta & Effexor. BUT - that does not eliminate the fact that each neurotransmitter adjustment takes 3 weeks (ever wonder why the doc said, "it might take a few weeks to start working" = ?) - so if you just cold turkey Prozac, you will still stack up about 9-12 months of symptoms all at once. Prozac's 48-62 (depending on which metabolites you are counting) long half life does not even last 3 weeks.

Please taper. Please taper. Please taper.

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JC, the site that you specify agrees with me that (long acting) Prozac "self tapers to a significant degree" by rating it as "low" on the risk of withdrawal issues.

The withdrawal problems are individual, with some people having much worse problems than others. When the patients don't know what to expect from withdrawal, it's worse.

I have worked with people who irregularly took the shorter acting meds, and exhibited behavioral issues, likely exacerbated by their inability/unwillingness to keep a regimen.

People might favor the longer acting meds for seasonal affective disorder because they don't need them all year round, and can generally go off of them more easily. They might also favor the long acting meds in the real setting of

unstable medication supplies,

unstable health care environment with unstable health care professionals,

strikes and shutdowns in health care,

unstable economic and social circumstances, etcetera.

Coming down off of them is not going be without problems, but it's less dangerous than suddenly withdrawing from the short acting ones.

I'm not a fan of turning to pharmaceuticals as the top choice to treat depression.

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My friend, all of these drugs are dangerous. The "long acting" one has been most highly linked to violence. I certainly would NOT recommend that someone go on Prozac for half a year, every year (use a light box!), and taper off.

Whether a drug is dangerous because of half life (like Paxil) or because of multiple receptors (like Cymbalta, Effexor, Lexapro) or because of how it sits in the individual's system - they are all dangerous.

If you were told that your car had a 60% chance of being fixed, would you pay for that service?

I can send you a list of 100 people who have struggled with Prozac. Maybe more (this is a rough estimate, just based on what I've seen on Surviving Antidepressants website).

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Yep, most drugs are dangerous.

That's the general reasoning for placing them in prescription category, so that they are utilized with some sort of oversight. The U.S. FDA has gotten more unreliable in their judgements lately. And since health care professionals are bailing, the oversight necessarily will be decreasing, so we will see more medication disasters of all kinds in the near future.

I see more of the problems as being related to misuse and lack of monitoring. Prozac has been in far greater use than the others of its general class, (to the extent that it was famously found in Britain's drinking water supply), and therefore one would expect that it is linked to more behavior issues. https://www.theguardian.com/society/2004/aug/08/health.mentalhealth

60 percent auto fix?? Depends upon the condition and the car. Don't know if you ever had a car, but people really are willing pay for attempts to fix a car that might not be successful. And analogous value judgements are made every day by people with varying appetites for risk, and varying medical conditions.

Some people prefer to take no prescription medications, and others are willing to load up.

Regarding your list of 100 patients: If you go to a place where people who have had adverse reactions to a drug gather online, you'll find people who have had adverse reactions to that drug. I can't send you lists of people who love their Prozac, because in the U.S.A., there are HIPAA (privacy) regulations. Also, Lexapro, escitalopram has eaten up a lot of the market share.

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Most people (I'd say up to 70%) love their antidepressants and believe they couldn't live without them.

Dr. Peter Breggin calls this "medication spellbinding," and it's a form of brain damage.

What these people don't realise is that it's not working just on their mood & brain. It's also affecting gut, endocrine, cardiac - entire systems. There are no studies on long term use (other than - as you say - the forums which have a lot of people suffering. Then, after 5, 10, 15 years, they start to get mysterious ailments, like IBS & Crohns, or autoimmune problems, Chronic Fatigue and/or Fibromyalgia...they never connect the mysterious ailments to the damage from the drugs. (and their doctors would never do so) But the damage is real.

I have friends on long term drugging who are going blind (just one example of a symptom). That's not on my forum - that's out here, in the real world.

It would have to be a pretty special car to roll the dice on a 60% repair. I like my mechanic to be closer to 95-100% (which is actually higher than I expect from doctors).

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I’m so glad to hear that you found what was right for you! Agree with you that many just prescribe any old thing and hope it sticks. My SSRIs were “prescribed” to me initially because the guy had samples in his closet.

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Thanks for the post. Surprising that questioning the safety and efficacy of drugs should be or should have become taboo. Surely the fist thing we need to do with any drug at any time. My father was put on anti schizophrenia drugs in a care home in the UK in 21 for dementia. He began behaving in ways he never had before. This behavior was used to up the dose. In the end the dose was 10 times the prescribed dose and he died a few weeks after the overdose was spotted and stopped by a doctor who cared enough to notice. Questioning this has been taboo and I have been cancelled and exiled because I did so. We have arrived at a dark place where the wisdom of the ages - that taking any drug might be a bad idea and that refusing all drugs all the time might be the best way to live - has been replaced by submission to experts who know best and wholesale drug addiction all over everywhere. Not a single member of my wider family is not on some drug or another. All believe that drugs are the way to be healthy. We need an explicit constitutional right to refuse drugs and not be discriminated against if we say no. If we don't get something this pretty soon I fear the drug pushers will be ruling the world.

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I have heard this story numerous times :(

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Your last two sentences deserve great attention and emphasis.

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Making this point to friends and family but sadly many seem to have fallen for the drug pushers' propaganda - that drug taking is always good for you with covid a public duty - perhaps a century of propaganda has had something to do with it. The old and the young see things a bit more clearly.

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What I find so bizarre is that many of the covidians in my circles, who were fine with the mandates, fine with Jab Crow, and fine with the authorities censoring "misinformation," seem to assume the politicians they don't align with will never win the presidency ever again. I mean, really? Once you establish these precedents, that violating people's civil rights is OK in the name of some emergency (as defined by those in power), what on God's green earth makes you think this won't eventually be turned against you, and what you would prefer to do for your own health, and what you would like to hear and read and to say about it all? It's as if, for them, the future just isn't a thing.

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You should have 50,000 subscribers! If you don't, that's a measure of how many people allow themselves to be propagandized.

I don't have any covidian friends / associates anymore. Decided I'd rather raise my standards even if it means being alone.

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Thank you for you kind comment, PRice. I'm always pleased to see new subscribers, but that was never my goal-- it's creating the archive, the List of Transcriptions, which I maintain at another platform, and I also have the transcripts printed out on paper, that they may survive to serve those writing this history in the future— perhaps a very distant future. I would like to think that some people might "wake up" now by reading through the transcriptions as they find them on my Substack, and also I would hope that readers might find some useful information, and some strength in solidarity with the many who spoke out and refused to comply, and this is why I take the trouble to spotlight one transcript daily (for now). But at this late date, November 2023, I think the damage has been done, and that and those who are willing and able to face things are already facing things.

P.S. May you find your good and worthy friends. I don't doubt that you will.

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Thank you! Think that more people would find you if Substack's search features were better.

I read a lot of research every day. I'm not waiting for evidence from forbidden research topics, though.

For example, Dr. Kory thinks shedding will continue. Here's the latest of his "the plural of anecdote is data" series:

https://pierrekorymedicalmusings.com/p/shedding-part-8-a-deluge-of-clinical

Then there's Dr. Makis, whom I have trouble reading.

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Heading that way too

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"How Dangerous Must a Drug Be Before it is Pulled from the Market?"

It seems like that depends on its profitability.

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Bingo! That was the point of this series.

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Exactly. What are a couple broken eggs when they get to drug up all the chickens?

"Just a cost of doing business."

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Perpetually drug up all the chickens.

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"It's on the schedule, nothing I can do" -- "doctors" these days.

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It usually is not discovered that a drug is harmful until it is out of patent.

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Discovered or disclosed?

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Nov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor

I suspected long ago that SSRIs were a factor in homicides by young men as soon as it was confirmed that they could lead to suicide.

It isn't much of a stretch for a young man who has decided on suicide to decide he might as well take out his perceived 'enemies' as well. And so he does.

As with the rash of unexpected deaths of young, healthy and vaccinated people that did not occur before the introduction of the Covid vax, I am old enough to recall that mass shootings were almost unheard of decades ago, in fact before the age of SSRIs and, likely, some other drugs. The 1966 University of Texas Tower shooting stunned the country. It turned out the shooter, Chapman, had a brain tumor. Thede days nobody is stunned and no brain tumors show up, but SSRIs do.

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Bingo, this is the point 100%

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I hear my inside

The mechanized hum of another world

Where no sun is shining

No red light flashing

Here in this darkness

I know what I've done

I know all at once who I am

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YxK-swFREo

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Nov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor

Very interesting. About 18 years ago I was on Prozac. It didn’t make me violent but it did make me want to kill myself and feel deeply disconnected from reality. Same experience with both Pristiq and Effexor. And in each and every case, I quit them all cold Turkey and tossed the meds into the garbage. Over time my depression lifted, as I changed my diet to primal eating, got outside more, found camaraderie at work and got my sleeping in order. By the time I was 27 I’d say my depression was making rounds every few months for a month at a time. But by age 30- after eating pretty much only carnivore and quitting my job, depression disappeared and hasn’t been back at all, even a little bit- I’m 35. Out of all family on both sides- ALL extended family- I’m the only one (other than my son) who hasn’t taken the clot shot or isn’t on ANY medication whatsoever. I do lots of extended water fasting (and lost so much hair from it lol but it’ll grow back again, it always does) and eat mostly animal foods, lots of raw meats. Let me tell you- it’s a lonely life over here, folks, as I’m sure most of you can relate. My family all thibk I’m nuts or exhibiting “concerning” behaviour for being “counter-culture” and always having to “do everything differently from everyone else”. I call it being informed. If fasting, limiting wifi, pure water, healthy animal foods diet, staying home with my kid, not being on any meds and not having any health issues is concerning behaviour, then this world is truly, truly fucked.

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I feel the same way. How can not wanting to take drugs be bad?

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Right??? It’s like they resent you for it or something. There’s some level of vitriol there.

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LOL on the last sentence.

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Nov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor

Incredible reporting on such an utterly disturbing subject! From the full series of anthrax shots I was given in the Marines (1998); to my first gastroenterologist appointment in 2005, where the doc prescribed me Paxil for "IBS"; to the recent Covid criminality: I've not a morsel of respect for the pharmaceutical industry. It's also chipping away at my regard for physicians, barring the Author(s) and others like Dr. Malone, of course, who are speaking out against the pharmaceutical racketeering machine. In the case of the aforementioned gastroenterologist, during my intake, he quickly discounted any dietary-related possibilities. After the colonoscopy came back clear and he checked all his boxes, he determined that it was my anxiety causing the chronic diarrhea, and therefore prescribed Paxil. It made me feel so bizarre after two or three days of ingestion that I immediately discontinued and never returned to him again. It doesn't surprise me one bit that this poison leads people to commit these heinous acts. It's high time to proverbially "chop the head off the big pharma snake", as well as the scoundrels who lobby, politicians who accept their bribes, the PR industry for painting them all in such a favorable light, and everyone else in the chain who profits from their ill-gotten gains!

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I am still meeting people who have weird disorders I realized came from their anthrax shots 20 years ago :(

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I would love to see an article from you on the topic of Anthrax, if you'd be inclined to do so at some point!

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Paxil for IBS. Yaaaaa, extra dumb. Worst prescribing I saw was Prozac for pancreatitis.

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I think. at least temporarily, paxil was marketed for those in menopause

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The founder of Surviving Antidepressants (www.survivingantidepressants.com) was caught in this trap. She started going through menopause, and a well-meaning doctor thought that was the thing to do (early 00's). Paroxetine. When menopause was well & truly over, she thought, I'll get off the drug. That started her journey - and - she founded Surviving Antidepressants to help others survive these effing drugs.

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My personal one is Percocet for a scratched cornea, which actually turned out to be allergy.

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90% of your serotonin is in the gut . . . . it might reduce symptoms, anyway, even though it wouldn't fix the problem.

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Turned out it was only a gluten sensitivity. After visiting 3 subsequent gastroenterologists (and two additional colonoscopies) over the span of a decade, and none of them having an interest in my diet, my chiropractor put me in contact with a really great food allergist and she had me cured in a matter of weeks. In fact, in the first 5 minutes of my meeting her and explaining my symptoms, she asked if I was ever tested for gluten sensitivities, to which I replied, "no".

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Nov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor

Good dissertation! I think the basic issue is that if we embrace the concept that psychotic drugs drives the shooters it negates the push to eliminate guns from the hands of American patriots and citizens! In addition, the psychotic drugs have to be cleared through the hepatic function, and when they can’t be cleared and the drug impact builds up in the brain, we have shooters acting out! The mass media is the beneficiary of 6 Billon dollars per year and you don’t bite the hand that feed you! Consequently, they won’t touch the subject and we keep killing each other needlessly

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Methylphenidate and THC (and Bernaysian programming; esp. in conjunction with HDTV) appear to also contribute.

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Lots of adjunct. Factors that may contribute to it! Ritalin has a black box warning because it can cause death! FDA bends over backwards position to

Favor big Pharma! That is why there are about 500 more drugs still on the market with a black box warning!

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That would imply the person has liver failure. And even if he/she did, the drug would not build up in the brain, ammonia would. People in end stage liver disease with high ammonia levels are in no condition to shoot a gun. Their sensorium is clouded, not in an angry way, but in a sedated way. The doctor who is prescribing should have access to recent labs and a CMP, which covers liver enzymes is a very commonly ordered panel. So your theory is not physiologically sound.

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Deficent liver function is not the same as liver failure. Western medicine often has a great deal of difficulty recognizing suboptimal function of a critical part of the body and just makes it a binary good vs. bad absolute thing.

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Are psychiatric drugs implicated in liver problems? I know someone who died of liver disease in their early 30's who was bipolar. Do not know what specific drugs they took.

Thanks AMD for another great article. I can't thank you enough for all the information you are providing. Just trying to assimilate and process it all (the stuff about zeta potential and CDR therapies more than this one, but someone I know well was prescribed Buspirone for anxiety and I could see negative personality changes, and persuaded them to quit taking it).

How can one find a practitioner to deal properly with the kinds of issues you talk about, like anxiety/claustophobia disorders caused by the C19 shots (started right after 2nd Moderna)? I'm convinced that the zeta/CDR issues being addressed would likely help, based on what I have read in your articles.

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Not necessarily. If the P450 enzyme system has trouble clearing the drug..it becomes an overdose!

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Nov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor

I remember being so shocked when I told a psych resident that I knew someone who had some negative effects after starting strong antidepressants, and he said something like, “that proves she needed the drugs, her going crazy would only happen if she needed them”. What a horrible thing for him to believe and be taught at Med school.

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Yup, it's horrible logic but one of the most common forms of gaslighting.

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Same gaslighting happens when one goes bonkers after quitting the drug. "Shows you need the drug, eh?"

All the algorithms point to "you need the drug."

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I do not get his meaning. Sorry to be so dense. Is he saying the drug reaction is confirmation of the reason it was given?

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Right, it makes no sense. That's gaslighting.

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Hmm. I had a very weird chocolate lab that I ultimately had to take to the university veterinary school for diagnosis. OCD. They said the drug likeliest to reduce or eliminate her symptoms was Paxil, or rather the first generation of Paxil, I forgot the name.

However, we were then warned that if we did go that route, she would have to be leashed at all times as it was more than likely she would become vicious. PASS. NOPE.

So. We lived with a really weird dog for ten years. But she was as sweet as pie.

The vets knew how bad these drugs were for animals. Pretty small leap to humans.

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Correct. Drugging of pets with SSRIs is another huge can of worms. Could I use your comment in a future article?

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I didn't know any better. I had a bizarre situation with 2 rescue cats, and the little one was frightened and freaked out all the time. The vet put her on some sort of tricyclic (anafranil?) at a very young age - 6 months (the time when her brain was forming). She was only on the drugs for about 6 months (the other rescue cat was re-homed, she became a solo cat) . She was calmer, and by age 5 was a nice cat. - but she was forever stupid. She just never developed properly. She lived to 16 - but her potential to be an excellent companion was stunted.

It makes me look at children on these drugs in a very nervous light.

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Of course!

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Nov 4, 2023Liked by A Midwestern Doctor

I think this issue is exceptionally complicated, especially as it relates to American young men. While it appears that some people do react violently while on SSRIs, many do not. I think a bigger issue for young American men—all American men, really—is the complete destruction of America, and the traditional values most American men could embrace with pride only a generation ago. If you are straight, European-American, Christian—the identity of most Americans until the last couple of decades—is there a recognizable, optimistic

future? Does it not appear that some of the enemies many of us believed wanted the destruction of America only a short while ago, have taken control, have “won?”

What I discovered after taking many SSRIs is that they merely muted my very real childhood trauma. And while I do not believe it will ever be fully resolved, I would rather feel and deal with the trauma rather than push it down, hide it. I am not sure how this relates to those who react violently to SSRIs, but I do think that my own anger and pain have real causes in my childhood—not misperceptions caused by “chemical imbalances.”

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While my SSRI experience was short-lived (thank God!), I self-medicated heavily with alcohol for the same reason as you for dealing with past traumas. 27 years of blackout-induced drinking, basically from 14 to 41 years old. I'm 49 now, and have been completely alcohol-free for 8 years. And while reality sucks sometimes, I'd take it over drunken oblivion any day of the week. I don't disagree with your thoughts on the state of America, either. As a Marine veteran, knowing what I know now, I would not be so keen in gearing up for combat under the orders of this criminal administration. Keep fighting the good fight!!

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The theory of serotonin deficiency causing depression has always been suspect and for years we have known now that it is invalid. Anything that increases serotonin is very bad news. But the serotonin deficiency theory has sold a lot of drugs, to the detriment of all of us.

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I tried to convince people of that for over a decade but they only started to believe me recently after a few mainstream publicatinos on it came out.

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Years ago I took Wellbutrin specifically for weight loss. I remember very clearly I was having an argument with my boyfriend at the time and instead of feeling angry I just felt nothing. My brain was angry but I didn’t have any emotional response. It felt extremely WEIRD. I had only taken a few doses but stopped immediately. I can’t imagine having no strong emotions. It’s inhuman.

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The sad thing about modern science is that a lot of it essentially wants you to be like that and I feel your story is an excellent anecdote for what is wrong with society.

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Well yes the powers that be love these drugs because everyone around you thinks you are so peaceful, easy going and easy to control, but inside your brain is pissed because you lost the desire to get what you want out of life or stand up for yourself…. Until you explode. Emotions make life worth living. We need to learn how to be emotionally intelligent not erase them.

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One can really dig into this with James Tunney's Plantation of the Automatons.

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